There’s been a lot of talk from Canadian officials and administrators about moving towards an “American model” of post-secondary education in Canada, but not a lot of clarifying about what that means for Canadian students. In En Greve, we attempt to deconstruct this and examine it from the perspectives of students and faculty.
I grew up in a family that very much believed in the Canadian (and American) dream, and saw education as the main way to that dream. I’m shocked by how common debt is in Canada, and horrified by what student debt looks like in the US; one thing that’s become apparent not only in my own research, but with things like the 99% and Occupy movements, is that student debt is so overwhelmingly prevalent in the US as to seem inescapable at times. The idea that one can work ones way through school and graduate debt-free is ridiculous when you consider that tuition costs several times more than the average annual household income.

There’s been a lot of talk from Canadian officials and administrators about moving towards an “American model” of post-secondary education in Canada, but not a lot of clarifying about what that means for Canadian students. In En Greve, we attempt to deconstruct this and examine it from the perspectives of students and faculty.

I grew up in a family that very much believed in the Canadian (and American) dream, and saw education as the main way to that dream. I’m shocked by how common debt is in Canada, and horrified by what student debt looks like in the US; one thing that’s become apparent not only in my own research, but with things like the 99% and Occupy movements, is that student debt is so overwhelmingly prevalent in the US as to seem inescapable at times. The idea that one can work ones way through school and graduate debt-free is ridiculous when you consider that tuition costs several times more than the average annual household income.